I ATTACHED OUR TWO CLIFTON STRENGHTHS FINES RESULTS AND THE VALUE, PERSONAL, BELIEFS AND PERSONAL BIAS ASSIGNMENT IS THE ONE THAT I UPLOAD
Use the perspectives and understandings about yourself that you have gained from both the Clifton Strengths Finder assessment and the Values, Beliefs, and Personal Bias assignment to identify a cause that is meaningful to you, one that you can contribute to as part of our service learning project for social change to support it. You will work towards completing this project throughout this course as your final project.  The authors of A Social Change Model of Leadership explained that “If knowledge is connected to something that you really care about, you will be more likely to act on it. “Commitment is a decision of the heart and mind to follow one course of action rather than another” (Fairholm, 1994, p. 122). It is both liberating and limiting. To decide to be an English major means you will likely never be a biologist. If you loved both fields of study, a commitment to one means grieving over the inability to devote energy to the other. Commitment means taking action. Our commitments to action are usually predicated on our most deeply felt beliefs. Consider how your beliefs can influence your behavior. For example, because you believe that people should treat each other with dignity and respect, you might volunteer to be on an inter-fraternity task force group on hazing. Because you believe deeply in social justice and equality, you might establish or join a group that studies and advocates for changes in campus admissions policies. Because you believe that children in an inner-city setting lack many of the opportunities that other children take for granted, you may volunteer weekly to tutor young children. “Commitment is a personal attitude or value that excites us to do whatever needs to be done because we see the need. More than mere identification of intent, commitment is doing. The attitude of commitment flows out of our beliefs and values and is part of our definition of who we are” (Fairholm, 1994, p. 121). It is important to link our motivated actions back to an articulation of our beliefs: “I have decided to do this, because I feel profoundly about that” (Astin & Astin, 1996, pp. 41-42).   
Other ideas for a service-learning project or change-action project (these terms are used interchangeably in the textbook) include:
If you value family, health, serving others, and caring, perhaps you would like to find a way to help homeless families and would opt for a service-learning project at someplace like Second Harvest Food Bank; or perhaps at a homeless shelter, or even at a non-profit service organization that supports families with children who are facing a medical crisis, such as the Ronald McDonald House. Students who have an emphasis on psychology, public policy, sociology, anthropology, and even life sciences coursework may find this type of service-learning to be closely aligned with their academic learning.
Perhaps you value adventure, caring, and creativity, and you have a deep love for the outdoors. A service-learning opportunity that might appeal to you could be connected to the environment, a project with a local river rehabilitation group, or beach clean-up, or even one in which you work to protect the sea turtle nests on Florida’s beaches. Students who have coursework in environmental science, biology, public policy, and even environmental engineering may find this type of service-learning to be an extension of the type of academic work they have completed. 
This discussion is a brainstorming opportunity, please use your colleague’s as a “hive mind” to help you in your brainstorming regarding your planned service-learning project. 
Post your top three values in your discussion response and your thoughts and ideas on current social or environmental issues that reflect those values. 
Initial post
Copy & Paste the below into your initial post:
Top three values:
Issues that reflect those values:
Cause meaningful to me: 
Possible Project Idea:

Nicole Saraga

Your Signature Theme Report
S U R V E Y C O M P L E T I O N D A T E : 0 6 – 3 0 – 2 0 2 2

DON CLIFTON

Father of Strengths Psychology and
Inventor of CliftonStrengths

77034384 (Nicole Saraga)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

1

Nicole Saraga
S U R V E Y C O M P L E T I O N D A T E : 0 6 – 3 0 – 2 0 2 2

Many years of research conducted by The Gallup Organization suggest that the most effective people are
those who understand their strengths and behaviors. These people are best able to develop strategies to
meet and exceed the demands of their daily lives, their careers, and their families.

A review of the knowledge and skills you have acquired can provide a basic sense of your abilities, but an
awareness and understanding of your natural talents will provide true insight into the core reasons behind
your consistent successes.

Your Signature Themes report presents your five most dominant themes of talent, in the rank order
revealed by your responses to StrengthsFinder. Of the 34 themes measured, these are your “top five.”

Your Signature Themes are very important in maximizing the talents that lead to your successes. By
focusing on your Signature Themes, separately and in combination, you can identify your talents, build
them into strengths, and enjoy personal and career success through consistent, near-perfect performance.

Strategic
The Strategic theme enables you to sort through the clutter and find the best route. It is not a skill that can
be taught. It is a distinct way of thinking, a special perspective on the world at large. This perspective
allows you to see patterns where others simply see complexity. Mindful of these patterns, you play out
alternative scenarios, always asking, “What if this happened? Okay, well what if this happened?” This
recurring question helps you see around the next corner. There you can evaluate accurately the potential
obstacles. Guided by where you see each path leading, you start to make selections. You discard the
paths that lead nowhere. You discard the paths that lead straight into resistance. You discard the paths
that lead into a fog of confusion. You cull and make selections until you arrive at the chosen path—your
strategy. Armed with your strategy, you strike forward. This is your Strategic theme at work: “What if?”
Select. Strike.

Achiever
Your Achiever theme helps explain your drive. Achiever describes a constant need for achievement. You
feel as if every day starts at zero. By the end of the day you must achieve something tangible in order to
feel good about yourself. And by “every day” you mean every single day—workdays, weekends, vacations.

77034384 (Nicole Saraga)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

2

No matter how much you may feel you deserve a day of rest, if the day passes without some form of
achievement, no matter how small, you will feel dissatisfied. You have an internal fire burning inside you. It
pushes you to do more, to achieve more. After each accomplishment is reached, the fire dwindles for a
moment, but very soon it rekindles itself, forcing you toward the next accomplishment. Your relentless need
for achievement might not be logical. It might not even be focused. But it will always be with you. As an
Achiever you must learn to live with this whisper of discontent. It does have its benefits. It brings you the
energy you need to work long hours without burning out. It is the jolt you can always count on to get you
started on new tasks, new challenges. It is the power supply that causes you to set the pace and define the
levels of productivity for your work group. It is the theme that keeps you moving.

Relator
Relator describes your attitude toward your relationships. In simple terms, the Relator theme pulls you
toward people you already know. You do not necessarily shy away from meeting new people—in fact, you
may have other themes that cause you to enjoy the thrill of turning strangers into friends—but you do
derive a great deal of pleasure and strength from being around your close friends. You are comfortable
with intimacy. Once the initial connection has been made, you deliberately encourage a deepening of the
relationship. You want to understand their feelings, their goals, their fears, and their dreams; and you want
them to understand yours. You know that this kind of closeness implies a certain amount of risk—you might
be taken advantage of—but you are willing to accept that risk. For you a relationship has value only if it is
genuine. And the only way to know that is to entrust yourself to the other person. The more you share with
each other, the more you risk together. The more you risk together, the more each of you proves your
caring is genuine. These are your steps toward real friendship, and you take them willingly.

Learner
You love to learn. The subject matter that interests you most will be determined by your other themes and
experiences, but whatever the subject, you will always be drawn to the process of learning. The process,
more than the content or the result, is especially exciting for you. You are energized by the steady and
deliberate journey from ignorance to competence. The thrill of the first few facts, the early efforts to recite
or practice what you have learned, the growing confidence of a skill mastered—this is the process that
entices you. Your excitement leads you to engage in adult learning experiences—yoga or piano lessons or
graduate classes. It enables you to thrive in dynamic work environments where you are asked to take on
short project assignments and are expected to learn a lot about the new subject matter in a short period of
time and then move on to the next one. This Learner theme does not necessarily mean that you seek to
become the subject matter expert, or that you are striving for the respect that accompanies a professional
or academic credential. The outcome of the learning is less significant than the “getting there.”

77034384 (Nicole Saraga)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

3

Activator
“When can we start?” This is a recurring question in your life. You are impatient for action. You may
concede that analysis has its uses or that debate and discussion can occasionally yield some valuable
insights, but deep down you know that only action is real. Only action can make things happen. Only action
leads to performance. Once a decision is made, you cannot not act. Others may worry that “there are still
some things we don’t know,” but this doesn’t seem to slow you. If the decision has been made to go across
town, you know that the fastest way to get there is to go stoplight to stoplight. You are not going to sit
around waiting until all the lights have turned green. Besides, in your view, action and thinking are not
opposites. In fact, guided by your Activator theme, you believe that action is the best device for learning.
You make a decision, you take action, you look at the result, and you learn. This learning informs your next
action and your next. How can you grow if you have nothing to react to? Well, you believe you can’t. You
must put yourself out there. You must take the next step. It is the only way to keep your thinking fresh and
informed. The bottom line is this: You know you will be judged not by what you say, not by what you think,
but by what you get done. This does not frighten you. It pleases you.

77034384 (Nicole Saraga)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

4

jose Quintana

Your Signature Theme Report
S U R V E Y C O M P L E T I O N D A T E : 0 6 – 3 0 – 2 0 2 2

DON CLIFTON

Father of Strengths Psychology and
Inventor of CliftonStrengths

77034479 (jose Quintana)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

1

jose Quintana
S U R V E Y C O M P L E T I O N D A T E : 0 6 – 3 0 – 2 0 2 2

Many years of research conducted by The Gallup Organization suggest that the most effective people are
those who understand their strengths and behaviors. These people are best able to develop strategies to
meet and exceed the demands of their daily lives, their careers, and their families.

A review of the knowledge and skills you have acquired can provide a basic sense of your abilities, but an
awareness and understanding of your natural talents will provide true insight into the core reasons behind
your consistent successes.

Your Signature Themes report presents your five most dominant themes of talent, in the rank order
revealed by your responses to StrengthsFinder. Of the 34 themes measured, these are your “top five.”

Your Signature Themes are very important in maximizing the talents that lead to your successes. By
focusing on your Signature Themes, separately and in combination, you can identify your talents, build
them into strengths, and enjoy personal and career success through consistent, near-perfect performance.

Deliberative
You are careful. You are vigilant. You are a private person. You know that the world is an unpredictable
place. Everything may seem in order, but beneath the surface you sense the many risks. Rather than
denying these risks, you draw each one out into the open. Then each risk can be identified, assessed, and
ultimately reduced. Thus, you are a fairly serious person who approaches life with a certain reserve. For
example, you like to plan ahead so as to anticipate what might go wrong. You select your friends cautiously
and keep your own counsel when the conversation turns to personal matters. You are careful not to give
too much praise and recognition, lest it be misconstrued. If some people don’t like you because you are not
as effusive as others, then so be it. For you, life is not a popularity contest. Life is something of a minefield.
Others can run through it recklessly if they so choose, but you take a different approach. You identify the
dangers, weigh their relative impact, and then place your feet deliberately. You walk with care.

Competition
Competition is rooted in comparison. When you look at the world, you are instinctively aware of other
people’s performance. Their performance is the ultimate yardstick. No matter how hard you tried, no matter
how worthy your intentions, if you reached your goal but did not outperform your peers, the achievement

77034479 (jose Quintana)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

2

feels hollow. Like all competitors, you need other people. You need to compare. If you can compare, you
can compete, and if you can compete, you can win. And when you win, there is no feeling quite like it. You
like measurement because it facilitates comparisons. You like other competitors because they invigorate
you. You like contests because they must produce a winner. You particularly like contests where you know
you have the inside track to be the winner. Although you are gracious to your fellow competitors and even
stoic in defeat, you don’t compete for the fun of competing. You compete to win. Over time you will come to
avoid contests where winning seems unlikely.

Ideation
You are fascinated by ideas. What is an idea? An idea is a concept, the best explanation of the most
events. You are delighted when you discover beneath the complex surface an elegantly simple concept to
explain why things are the way they are. An idea is a connection. Yours is the kind of mind that is always
looking for connections, and so you are intrigued when seemingly disparate phenomena can be linked by
an obscure connection. An idea is a new perspective on familiar challenges. You revel in taking the world
we all know and turning it around so we can view it from a strange but strangely enlightening angle. You
love all these ideas because they are profound, because they are novel, because they are clarifying,
because they are contrary, because they are bizarre. For all these reasons you derive a jolt of energy
whenever a new idea occurs to you. Others may label you creative or original or conceptual or even smart.
Perhaps you are all of these. Who can be sure? What you are sure of is that ideas are thrilling. And on
most days this is enough.

Command
Command leads you to take charge. Unlike some people, you feel no discomfort with imposing your views
on others. On the contrary, once your opinion is formed, you need to share it with others. Once your goal is
set, you feel restless until you have aligned others with you. You are not frightened by confrontation; rather,
you know that confrontation is the first step toward resolution. Whereas others may avoid facing up to life’s
unpleasantness, you feel compelled to present the facts or the truth, no matter how unpleasant it may be.
You need things to be clear between people and challenge them to be clear-eyed and honest. You push
them to take risks. You may even intimidate them. And while some may resent this, labeling you
opinionated, they often willingly hand you the reins. People are drawn toward those who take a stance and
ask them to move in a certain direction. Therefore, people will be drawn to you. You have presence. You
have Command.

77034479 (jose Quintana)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

3

Intellection
You like to think. You like mental activity. You like exercising the “muscles” of your brain, stretching them in
multiple directions. This need for mental activity may be focused; for example, you may be trying to solve a
problem or develop an idea or understand another person’s feelings. The exact focus will depend on your
other strengths. On the other hand, this mental activity may very well lack focus. The theme of Intellection
does not dictate what you are thinking about; it simply describes that you like to think. You are the kind of
person who enjoys your time alone because it is your time for musing and reflection. You are introspective.
In a sense you are your own best companion, as you pose yourself questions and try out answers on
yourself to see how they sound. This introspection may lead you to a slight sense of discontent as you
compare what you are actually doing with all the thoughts and ideas that your mind conceives. Or this
introspection may tend toward more pragmatic matters such as the events of the day or a conversation that
you plan to have later. Wherever it leads you, this mental hum is one of the constants of your life.

77034479 (jose Quintana)
Copyright © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

4

Your Signature Theme Report
jose Quintana
Deliberative
Competition
Ideation
Command
Intellection




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